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Vani

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So I'm gonna be "graduating" Eight grade soon. Every year two kids are picked to give a speech at the big event at the end of the year.
So my Language Arts teacher was grading one of my papers and said I should do it. The writing portion isn't hard its mainly just the public speaking :/ I get horribly shy and can always fail at putting the expressions from writings in to words. I'm not sure I'd even be able to give it without sounding totally retarded just messing up alltogether.
So should I risk it? Or should play it safe and just not...
I'd also love to know any EFFECTIVE ideas for getting rid of stage fright.
Thanks.
 

D∆NTE

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The risk is worth the reward. Go on youtube and look up video's to help your self esteem. Just go up there and not care, act as if its a normal talk with friends instead of a normal speech. And prepare.
 

Mistearea

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D∆NTE;5491767 said:
The risk is worth the reward. Go on youtube and look up video's to help your self esteem. Just go up there and not care, act as if its a normal talk with friends instead of a normal speech. And prepare.

This.

Also, my public speaking Prof says that it helps to just remember that everyone there is your equal. You seem to have it easier than I do because you don't have a teacher giving you a grade for it. And even though this is a give, have notecards. I recently did one without the cards and forgot everything. But also find a way to have fun with it. I've noticed that adding humor helps and visual aids REALLY help with it. So maybe set up some slides or something to go along with your speech.
 
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Oberon

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I agree that the opportunity and reward is well worth the chance of screwing up. The one thing that helps me in these situations is trying to ignore the thoughts of screwing up and instead just going, doing it and not second guessing (during the speech I mean).

Also yeah everyone there is your equal. But remember your teacher chose you to give the speech. Use that raise in self esteem as motivation :)
 

Mythological Omega

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Have note cards, but do NOT read them verbatim. What I mean by that is don't just stare at them and read them. Just take a deep breath before you go out there and give the speech. Also, don't apologize if you screw up a word every now and then; no one expects you to give a flawless speech and apologizing for minor mistakes will give ways for the nervousness to surface.
 

Taylor

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Remember that you're not there to necessarily please anyone and everyone. They're not expecting you to give some Presidential speech or anything.

Depending on how much time you have: write your speech; practice your speech in private until you can read it without constantly having to look at notecards (this is because when you public speak, looking at your audience is typically better); and then try reading in front of people you're comfortable with; then move on to larger crowds, if possible. Also, keep in mind that if you look out at the audience, you don't actually have to look at them. Look at other, idle things around them: a tree, the ground, a chair. If looking directly at them makes you nervous, just look around them. Whatever makes you most comfortable.

Remember, public speaking takes practice. I had the same issue: I couldn't speak in front of people, and if I did, I'd not look at anyone; I would only look down at my notes. However, after doing Model United Nations for three years now, I've become pretty darn good at public speaking, and I'm now in a variety of activities at school that require you to public speak quite often (including Secretary General of our Model UN program <3). Everyone is afraid when they first get up in front of people, but don't worry too much about it. If you just let it flow out, it'll be fine.
 

Maxyli138

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When I stand in front of a crowd to give a speech or sing or perform, I just remember: they are only people. Just a bunch of immature adolescents. So who cares what they think? Memorize your speech, it looks unprofessional using note cards, and walk out there with your head held high and proud. Then all that's left is talking. Putting words together to form a sentence, linking sentences into paragraphs, paragraphs turn into speeches. So simple if you think about it.

And if it makes you feel better, I guarantee half of those students won't be listening, but will clap anyway because they're expected to.
 

Vani

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Haha thanks for the advice guys.
Apreciate itt.
 

metrifyx

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When I stand in front of a crowd to give a speech or sing or perform, I just remember: they are only people. Just a bunch of immature adolescents. So who cares what they think? Memorize your speech, it looks unprofessional using note cards, and walk out there with your head held high and proud. Then all that's left is talking. Putting words together to form a sentence, linking sentences into paragraphs, paragraphs turn into speeches. So simple if you think about it.

And if it makes you feel better, I guarantee half of those students won't be listening, but will clap anyway because they're expected to.

o/

I agree with everyone else; it's an amazing opportunity. Trust me, English teachers will love you next year. Just be sure to write something that you're proud of, and when you do perform, be proud. Don't hunch over or fidget or anything like that. Speak loudly and confidently like you're the amazing writer your teacher says you are, and command those kids to listen. I would watch movie monologues or speeches online since you said you had trouble with emotion. Take note of the inflection in the speakers' voices. Most importantly, practice! If nothing else, know your speech and build up your confidence.

The most effective way (for me at least) to cure stage fright: Think of the worst-case scenario. So what if you mess up; is your life going to end? No. If you make a mistake, you'll look back on it and laugh in the future. Besides, you get man-points just for having the guts to go up there.

Knock 'em dead! C:
 

Marly

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Honestly, if you channel a lot of your energy into what you're saying as opposed to who's listening, you'd be surprised by how easy it is to block out a crowd. I don't mean like holding the paper up to your face and reading intently, I mean constantly be thinking of your tone or your mannerisms and not what people are thinking about you. Seeing as only two students get picked you can bet the parents are already going to be impressed with you right off the bat.
 

Evello

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Do it.

Take it easy. I don't think I myself typically act nervous during public speaking (I'm told I have a very good radio announcer voice too, which doesn't hurt), but I do get shaky when speaking so I can relate. The way I stay calm is just to remember that, though it sounds mean, no one cares at all if you mess up. When I listen to speeches and such, I away find myself sort of rooting for the speaker. If they mess up, I don't care myself, I won't lose sleep, and I probably won't ever think about it again after the mistake. I just hope that they don't care. If the speaker doesn't, and they just continue on their merry way, then everything's fine and dandy. I think most people are like that. They just don't care. In a good way.

I would definitely take the opportunity. It sounds like a pretty big honor.
 

The Conquerer

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Extemporaneous (planned and practice) is the key. Try to practice your performance in front of friends and family and get in front of a mirror if you have to in order to get the knack down (like posture). Also, know your stuff inside and out before doing your presentation, that will limit the ums, uhs, awkward pauses, and certain repetitive word usages like: like. The moment you run out of things to say, the moment you feel nervousness, which will make you think that people don't know what you're talking about, which will cause you to freeze up even if to them, you are only taking a pause of about 2-3 secs (it's always longer than you think it is if you think about it). Remember, it's how you sell it, not to say you should bull your way through, but be creative.
 
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